The origins of economic prosperity: lessons from the enlightenment

Jun
20
06:00 PM - 07:15 PM

Add to your Calendar

Stay updated →receive newsletter

Livestream

Roots of economic prosperity

Join us for a discussion on the past, present, and future of innovation and the modern economy. Economic historian Joel Mokyr takes us on a journey to the roots of economic prosperity, answering questions such as: What sparked the industrial revolution? What are the intellectual underpinnings of economic growth? Building on this, he assesses the current global economic situation, focusing on key issues, such as the future of work in an increasingly technologized world or the potential threat to our prosperity posed by today’s stifling political environment. Mokyr sees today’s world as more pluralistic and competitive than ever and states: “Most nations realize they have to keep up, or else they will fall behind in global competition.”

Join us for a discussion on the past, present, and future of innovation and the modern economy. Economic historian Joel Mokyr takes us on a journey to the roots of economic prosperity, answering questions such as: What sparked the industrial revolution? What are the intellectual underpinnings of economic growth? Building on this, he assesses the current global economic situation, focusing on key issues, such as the future of work in an increasingly technologized world or the potential threat to our prosperity posed by today’s stifling political environment. Mokyr sees today’s world as more pluralistic and competitive than ever and states: “Most nations realize they have to keep up, or else they will fall behind in global competition.”

Speaker

Robert H. Strotz Professor of Arts and Sciences, Northwestern University
Prof. Joel Mokyr

Joel Mokyr is Robert H. Strotz Professor of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Economics and History at Northwestern University. Joel Mokyr conducts research on the economic history of Europe, and specializes in the period 1750–1914. His current research is concerned with the understanding of the economic and intellectual roots of technological progress and the growth of useful knowledge in European societies, as well as the impact that industrialization and economic progress have had on economic welfare. He is currently co-editor of a book series, the Princeton University Press Economic History of the Western World. He was the 2006 winner of the biennial Heineken Award for History offered by the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences and the winner of the 2015 Balzan International Prize for economic history. His latest book is A Culture of Growth - Origins of the Modern Economy, to be published by Princeton University Press in 2016.

UBS Foundation Professor of Macroeconomics and Financial Markets, Research Fellow CEPR

Joachim Voth received his PhD from Oxford in 1996. He works on financial crises, long-run growth, as well as on the origins of political extremism. He has examined public debt dynamics and bank lending to the first serial defaulter in history, analysed risk-taking behaviour by lenders as a result of personal shocks, and the investor performance during speculative bubbles. Joachim has also examined the deep historical roots of anti-Semitism, showing that the same cities where pogroms occurred in the Middle Age also persecuted Jews more in the 1930s; he has analyzed the extent to which schooling can create radical racial stereotypes over the long run, and how dense social networks (“social capital”) facilitated the spread of the Nazi party. In his work on long-run growth, he has investigated the effects of fertility restriction, the role of warfare, and the importance of state capacity. Joachim has published more than 80 academic articles and 3 academic books, 5 trade books and more than 50 newspaper columns, op-eds and book reviews. His research has been highlighted in The Economist, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Guardian, El Pais, Vanguardia, La Repubblica, the Frankfurter Allgemeine, NZZ, der Standard, der Spiegel, CNN, RTN, Swiss and German TV and radio.

Robert H. Strotz Professor of Arts and Sciences, Northwestern University
Prof. Joel Mokyr

Joel Mokyr is Robert H. Strotz Professor of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Economics and History at Northwestern University. Joel Mokyr conducts research on the economic history of Europe, and specializes in the period 1750–1914. His current research is concerned with the understanding of the economic and intellectual roots of technological progress and the growth of useful knowledge in European societies, as well as the impact that industrialization and economic progress have had on economic welfare. He is currently co-editor of a book series, the Princeton University Press Economic History of the Western World. He was the 2006 winner of the biennial Heineken Award for History offered by the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences and the winner of the 2015 Balzan International Prize for economic history. His latest book is A Culture of Growth - Origins of the Modern Economy, to be published by Princeton University Press in 2016.

UBS Foundation Professor of Macroeconomics and Financial Markets, Research Fellow CEPR

Joachim Voth received his PhD from Oxford in 1996. He works on financial crises, long-run growth, as well as on the origins of political extremism. He has examined public debt dynamics and bank lending to the first serial defaulter in history, analysed risk-taking behaviour by lenders as a result of personal shocks, and the investor performance during speculative bubbles. Joachim has also examined the deep historical roots of anti-Semitism, showing that the same cities where pogroms occurred in the Middle Age also persecuted Jews more in the 1930s; he has analyzed the extent to which schooling can create radical racial stereotypes over the long run, and how dense social networks (“social capital”) facilitated the spread of the Nazi party. In his work on long-run growth, he has investigated the effects of fertility restriction, the role of warfare, and the importance of state capacity. Joachim has published more than 80 academic articles and 3 academic books, 5 trade books and more than 50 newspaper columns, op-eds and book reviews. His research has been highlighted in The Economist, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Guardian, El Pais, Vanguardia, La Repubblica, the Frankfurter Allgemeine, NZZ, der Standard, der Spiegel, CNN, RTN, Swiss and German TV and radio.

Venue

Universität Zürich

Rämistrasse 71, 8001 Zürich
(Google Maps)