How can behavioral economics improve people's lives?

Apr
25
06:00 PM - 07:15 PM

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Livestream

Enhancing our lives

Behavioral economics has the potential to play a pivotal role in enhancing our lives. Indeed, insights from this field can empower individuals to make informed choices in various aspects of life. From financial decisions to health and beyond, there are multiple practical applications of behavioral economics that contribute to personal well-being. Join us for an enlightening discussion on how understanding our cognitive biases can lead to improved decision-making and ultimately contribute to a better, more fulfilling life.

Behavioral economics has the potential to play a pivotal role in enhancing our lives. Indeed, insights from this field can empower individuals to make informed choices in various aspects of life. From financial decisions to health and beyond, there are multiple practical applications of behavioral economics that contribute to personal well-being. Join us for an enlightening discussion on how understanding our cognitive biases can lead to improved decision-making and ultimately contribute to a better, more fulfilling life.

Speaker

Edward Ames Edmonds Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Prof. Douglas Bernheim

B. Douglas Bernheim is Edward Ames Edmonds Professor of Economics at Stanford University. With a focus on Public Economics and Behavioral Economics, he has made signifi cant contributions to the fi eld through his research and publications. Professor Bernheim is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Senior Fellow of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. He has also held various prestigious positions in the past, including serving as the Director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Bernheim’s work has been recognized with numerous awards and honors, highlighting his expertise and impact in the fi eld of economics.

Professor of Economics, Affiliated Professor at the UBS Center

Ernst Fehr received his doctorate from the University of Vienna in 1986. His work has shown how social motives shape the cooperation, negotiations and coordination among actors and how this affects the functioning of incentives, markets and organisations. His work identifies important conditions under which cooperation flourishes and breaks down. The work on the psychological foundations of incentives informs us about the merits and the limits of financial incentives for the compensation of employees. In other work he has shown the importance of corporate culture for the performance of firms. In more recent work he shows how social motives affect how people vote on issues related to the redistribution of incomes and how differences in people’s intrinsic patience is related to wealth inequality. His work has found large resonance inside and outside academia with more than 100’000 Google Scholar citations and his work has been mentioned many times in international and national newspapers.

Edward Ames Edmonds Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Prof. Douglas Bernheim

B. Douglas Bernheim is Edward Ames Edmonds Professor of Economics at Stanford University. With a focus on Public Economics and Behavioral Economics, he has made signifi cant contributions to the fi eld through his research and publications. Professor Bernheim is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Senior Fellow of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. He has also held various prestigious positions in the past, including serving as the Director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Bernheim’s work has been recognized with numerous awards and honors, highlighting his expertise and impact in the fi eld of economics.

Professor of Economics, Affiliated Professor at the UBS Center

Ernst Fehr received his doctorate from the University of Vienna in 1986. His work has shown how social motives shape the cooperation, negotiations and coordination among actors and how this affects the functioning of incentives, markets and organisations. His work identifies important conditions under which cooperation flourishes and breaks down. The work on the psychological foundations of incentives informs us about the merits and the limits of financial incentives for the compensation of employees. In other work he has shown the importance of corporate culture for the performance of firms. In more recent work he shows how social motives affect how people vote on issues related to the redistribution of incomes and how differences in people’s intrinsic patience is related to wealth inequality. His work has found large resonance inside and outside academia with more than 100’000 Google Scholar citations and his work has been mentioned many times in international and national newspapers.

Venue

Universität Zürich

RAA-G-01, Rämistrasse 59, 8001 Zürich
(Google Maps)