European energy policy at war

Oct
05
05:00 PM - 06:00 PM

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Winter is coming for European gas

This webcast will discuss the economics of the ongoing energy crisis in Europe. Russia's gas supply restrictions have precipitated an energy crunch that has sent prices of gas and electricity to unprecedented levels. Faced with this crisis, European policymakers have largely devoted their resources to subsidizing demand to ease symptoms (high prices) rather than attacking the underlying disease (supply shortage). Insights from recent economics research will be discussed in the context of evaluating the consequences of policymakers' decisions, and alternative paths forward.

Steve Cicala will review recent economic research on the topic and take questions in his live webinar on 5 October at 17:00 CET. The host will be David Hémous (University of Zurich).

This is a public event with free access via livestream on our website.

This webcast will discuss the economics of the ongoing energy crisis in Europe. Russia's gas supply restrictions have precipitated an energy crunch that has sent prices of gas and electricity to unprecedented levels. Faced with this crisis, European policymakers have largely devoted their resources to subsidizing demand to ease symptoms (high prices) rather than attacking the underlying disease (supply shortage). Insights from recent economics research will be discussed in the context of evaluating the consequences of policymakers' decisions, and alternative paths forward.

Steve Cicala will review recent economic research on the topic and take questions in his live webinar on 5 October at 17:00 CET. The host will be David Hémous (University of Zurich).

Steve Cicala is an associate professor in the Department of Economics at Tufts University
Steve Cicala is an associate professor in the Department of Economics at Tufts University

Speakers

Associate professor in the Department of Economics at Tufts University
Prof. Steve Cicala

Steve Cicala an associate professor in the Department of Economics at Tufts University and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, where he co-directs the NBER Project on the Economic Analysis of Regulation. His work focuses on the economics of regulation, particularly with respect to environmental and energy policy. He has published extensively on the economics of the electricity sector. He holds and AM and Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, and an AB in Economics from the University of Chicago.

UBS Foundation Associate Professor of Economics of Innovation and Entrepreneurship

David Hémous received his PhD from Harvard University in 2012. He is a macroeconomist working on Economic Growth and Innovation. His work highlights that innovation responds to economic incentives and that public policies should be designed taking this dependence into account. In particular, he has showed in the context of climate change policy that innovations in the car industry responds to gas prices and that global and regional climate policies should support clean innovation to efficiently reduce CO2 emissions. His work on technological change and income distribution shows that higher labor costs lead to more automation, and that the recent increase in labor income inequality and in the capital share can be explained by a secular increase in automation. He has also showed that innovation affects top income shares. His work has been highlighted in several newspapers and magazines including Le Monde, The Economist, The Washington Post or Forbes, and it has been presented in policy circles such as COP 15 conference in Copenhagen or the French parliamentary meetings.

Associate professor in the Department of Economics at Tufts University
Prof. Steve Cicala

Steve Cicala an associate professor in the Department of Economics at Tufts University and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, where he co-directs the NBER Project on the Economic Analysis of Regulation. His work focuses on the economics of regulation, particularly with respect to environmental and energy policy. He has published extensively on the economics of the electricity sector. He holds and AM and Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, and an AB in Economics from the University of Chicago.

UBS Foundation Associate Professor of Economics of Innovation and Entrepreneurship

David Hémous received his PhD from Harvard University in 2012. He is a macroeconomist working on Economic Growth and Innovation. His work highlights that innovation responds to economic incentives and that public policies should be designed taking this dependence into account. In particular, he has showed in the context of climate change policy that innovations in the car industry responds to gas prices and that global and regional climate policies should support clean innovation to efficiently reduce CO2 emissions. His work on technological change and income distribution shows that higher labor costs lead to more automation, and that the recent increase in labor income inequality and in the capital share can be explained by a secular increase in automation. He has also showed that innovation affects top income shares. His work has been highlighted in several newspapers and magazines including Le Monde, The Economist, The Washington Post or Forbes, and it has been presented in policy circles such as COP 15 conference in Copenhagen or the French parliamentary meetings.

Livestream