Panel discussion: Inequality - facts and consequences

Oct
28
04:00 PM - 05:15 PM

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Video

Panel session

The rise and persistence of economic inequality in many developed countries have motivated growing concern about the consequences of disparities. Over the past ten years, research on economic inequality and its consequences has expanded rapidly, giving us some initial purchase on whether these concerns are likely to be realized. What is the impact of inequality on health, education, social relations, and politics? Will rising inequality deepen social divisions? What are the implications of growing inequality for school outcomes? What is the influence of inequality on health outcomes? These and related questions will be debated by three economists, which have done extensive research on inequality and its consequences.

Janet Currie is a pioneer in the economic analysis of child development. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in health and access to health care, environmental threats to health, the important role of mental health, and the long-run impact of health problems in pregnancy and early childhood.

David Dorn’s research spans the fields of labor economics, international trade, political economy, and macroeconomics. He leads the new University Research Priority Programs (URPP) Equality of Opportunity at the University of Zurich. The program aims to investigate the economic and societal changes that give rise to inequality. The researchers involved in the program will also analyze concrete legal frameworks and political measures that help to increase equal opportunities for all members of a society.

Branko Milanovic’s main area of work is income inequality, in individual countries and globally, as well as historically, among pre-industrial societies (Roman Empire, Byzantium, and France before the Revolution), and even inequality in soccer. He has published a number of articles on the methodology and empirics of global income distribution and the effects of globalization.

The rise and persistence of economic inequality in many developed countries have motivated growing concern about the consequences of disparities. Over the past ten years, research on economic inequality and its consequences has expanded rapidly, giving us some initial purchase on whether these concerns are likely to be realized. What is the impact of inequality on health, education, social relations, and politics? Will rising inequality deepen social divisions? What are the implications of growing inequality for school outcomes? What is the influence of inequality on health outcomes? These and related questions will be debated by three economists, which have done extensive research on inequality and its consequences.

Janet Currie is a pioneer in the economic analysis of child development. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in health and access to health care, environmental threats to health, the important role of mental health, and the long-run impact of health problems in pregnancy and early childhood.

Janet Currie, Princeton University
Janet Currie, Princeton University
David Dorn, University of Zurich
David Dorn, University of Zurich
Branko Milanovic, City University of New York Graduate Center
Branko Milanovic, City University of New York Graduate Center

Articles

«Heute gebe es zwei Varianten des Kapitalismus, sagt Branko Milanović. In einem unterhaltsamen Buch zeigt der Ökonom deren Schwächen und Stärken auf.»
NZZ am Sonntag, Kapitalismus auf der Couch, 28.10.2020

«Heute gebe es zwei Varianten des Kapitalismus, sagt Branko Milanović. In einem unterhaltsamen Buch zeigt der Ökonom deren Schwächen und Stärken auf.»
NZZ am Sonntag, Kapitalismus auf der Couch, 28.10.2020

Program overview

Research slam: (In-)Equality and prosperity Wednesday, 21.10.2020 | 16:30–17:30 (CET)
Moderator: Nir Jaimovich
Speakers: participants as listed
Panel session: Inequality - facts and consequences Wednesday, 28.10.2020 | 16:00–17:15 (CET)
Moderator: James Mackintosh
Speakers: Janet Currie, David Dorn, Branko Milanovic
Webinar: Taxing the superrich Tuesday, 3.11.2020 | 16:00–17:00 (CET)
Speaker: Florian Scheuer
Keynote lecture: Inequality and the future of capitalism Wednesday, 11.11.2020 | 18:00–19:00 (CET)
Speaker: Nobel Laureate Sir Angus Deaton
Research slam: (In-)Equality and prosperity Wednesday, 21.10.2020 | 16:30–17:30 (CET)
Moderator: Nir Jaimovich
Speakers: participants as listed
Panel session: Inequality - facts and consequences Wednesday, 28.10.2020 | 16:00–17:15 (CET)
Moderator: James Mackintosh
Speakers: Janet Currie, David Dorn, Branko Milanovic
Webinar: Taxing the superrich Tuesday, 3.11.2020 | 16:00–17:00 (CET)
Speaker: Florian Scheuer
Keynote lecture: Inequality and the future of capitalism Wednesday, 11.11.2020 | 18:00–19:00 (CET)
Speaker: Nobel Laureate Sir Angus Deaton

Forum for Economic Dialogue

Special times call for special measures. That is why our annual forum this year took place online. Despite the change in format, we had sought to maintain our customary standards. We had a series of events in store, focusing on different aspects of inequality – a topic that has become even more important in light of the global pandemic and its devastating consequences, which has hit many of the most vulnerable people in the world particularly hard. Visit our event hub for timely updates and background information.

Special times call for special measures. That is why our annual forum this year took place online. Despite the change in format, we had sought to maintain our customary standards. We had a series of events in store, focusing on different aspects of inequality – a topic that has become even more important in light of the global pandemic and its devastating consequences, which has hit many of the most vulnerable people in the world particularly hard. Visit our event hub for timely updates and background information.

2020_forum2

Speakers

Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University
Prof. Janet Currie

Janet Currie is a pioneer in the economic analysis of child development. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in health and access to health care, environmental threats to health, the important role of mental health, and the long-run impact of health problems in pregnancy and early childhood.

UBS Foundation Professor of Globalization and Labor Markets, Research Fellow CEPR

David Dorn received his doctorate from the University of St. Gallen in 2009. His work studies the impact of globalization and automation on the labor market and society. He showed that rapidly rising import competition from China had more profound impacts on the U.S. labor market than was previously assumed. The relative decline of employment and wages in trade-exposed locations is also associated with decreasing marriage rates, rising drug mortality, and increased electoral support for politicians with non-moderate ideologies. In other work, he studies how the automation of routine labor and the rise of superstar firms have contributed to various facets of inequality. David’s work has been cited in thousands of academic papers and hundreds of newspaper articles.

Presidential Professor at the City University of New York Graduate Center and senior fellow at the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality
Prof. Branko Milanovic

Branko Milanovic’s main area of work is income inequality, in individual countries and globally, as well as historically, among pre-industrial societies (Roman Empire, Byzantium, and France before the Revolution), and even inequality in soccer. He has published a number of articles on the methodology and empirics of global income distribution and the effects of globalization.

The Wall Street Journal
James Mackintosh

James Mackintosh is a senior columnist at The Wall Street Journal (WSJ). He joined the WSJ in 2016, after almost 20 years at the Financial Times, most recently as Investment Editor and writer of the Short View column. He is a graduate of St Catherine's College, Oxford, where he gained a first-class degree in Philosophy and Psychology.

Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University
Prof. Janet Currie

Janet Currie is a pioneer in the economic analysis of child development. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in health and access to health care, environmental threats to health, the important role of mental health, and the long-run impact of health problems in pregnancy and early childhood.

UBS Foundation Professor of Globalization and Labor Markets, Research Fellow CEPR

David Dorn received his doctorate from the University of St. Gallen in 2009. His work studies the impact of globalization and automation on the labor market and society. He showed that rapidly rising import competition from China had more profound impacts on the U.S. labor market than was previously assumed. The relative decline of employment and wages in trade-exposed locations is also associated with decreasing marriage rates, rising drug mortality, and increased electoral support for politicians with non-moderate ideologies. In other work, he studies how the automation of routine labor and the rise of superstar firms have contributed to various facets of inequality. David’s work has been cited in thousands of academic papers and hundreds of newspaper articles.

Presidential Professor at the City University of New York Graduate Center and senior fellow at the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality
Prof. Branko Milanovic

Branko Milanovic’s main area of work is income inequality, in individual countries and globally, as well as historically, among pre-industrial societies (Roman Empire, Byzantium, and France before the Revolution), and even inequality in soccer. He has published a number of articles on the methodology and empirics of global income distribution and the effects of globalization.

The Wall Street Journal
James Mackintosh

James Mackintosh is a senior columnist at The Wall Street Journal (WSJ). He joined the WSJ in 2016, after almost 20 years at the Financial Times, most recently as Investment Editor and writer of the Short View column. He is a graduate of St Catherine's College, Oxford, where he gained a first-class degree in Philosophy and Psychology.