Public event/Inaugural lecture

Employment and the macroeconomy: facts, theory, and policy

Nov
04
06:15 PM - 07:00 PM

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Intro

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Advances in automation technologies have left an indelible mark on the labor market in industrialized economies, as they have experienced a significant drop in the fraction of the population employed in jobs in the middle of the occupational wage distribution. In his inaugural lecture, Nir Jaimovich will address this phenomenon and discuss various public policies options.

Nir Jaimovich was appointed as Professor of Economics, affiliated with the UBS Center, in 2017. His research aims at macroeconomics, cyclical fluctuations and labor economics.

Professor Jaimovich’s inaugural lecture will be open to the public and will be followed by a cocktail reception in the Lichthof.

Advances in automation technologies have left an indelible mark on the labor market in industrialized economies, as they have experienced a significant drop in the fraction of the population employed in jobs in the middle of the occupational wage distribution. In his inaugural lecture, Nir Jaimovich will address this phenomenon and discuss various public policies options.

Nir Jaimovich was appointed as Professor of Economics, affiliated with the UBS Center, in 2017. His research aims at macroeconomics, cyclical fluctuations and labor economics.

Speaker

Professor of Economics

Nir Jaimovich received his PhD from Northwestern University in 2004. He works on macroeconomics questions with special emphasis on business cycles, labor markets, and the macroeconomic implications of micro product level data and was head of the NBER price dynamics group (together with Bob Hall). Within these research areas, he combines new data and quantitative theories to tackle long-standing macroeconomic questions. In the area of labor/macro his work shows how demographic composition and occupation structure of the economy shape the dynamics of the business cycle. In addition, his work examines the empirical and theoretical plausibility of signals and uncertainty about future economic fundamentals functioning as important drivers of business cycles. Finally, his micro-pricing product-level data shows how actual firms’ pricing strategies shapes the insights regarding the extent that monetary policy has an impact on the economy. His work has found large resonance inside and outside academia and was featured within policy circles (such as White House official publications) and media outlets such The New York Times, Washington Post, The Economist, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Guardian, Forbes, Swiss and German media.

Professor of Economics

Nir Jaimovich received his PhD from Northwestern University in 2004. He works on macroeconomics questions with special emphasis on business cycles, labor markets, and the macroeconomic implications of micro product level data and was head of the NBER price dynamics group (together with Bob Hall). Within these research areas, he combines new data and quantitative theories to tackle long-standing macroeconomic questions. In the area of labor/macro his work shows how demographic composition and occupation structure of the economy shape the dynamics of the business cycle. In addition, his work examines the empirical and theoretical plausibility of signals and uncertainty about future economic fundamentals functioning as important drivers of business cycles. Finally, his micro-pricing product-level data shows how actual firms’ pricing strategies shapes the insights regarding the extent that monetary policy has an impact on the economy. His work has found large resonance inside and outside academia and was featured within policy circles (such as White House official publications) and media outlets such The New York Times, Washington Post, The Economist, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Guardian, Forbes, Swiss and German media.

Venue

University of Zurich

Main Auditorium, KOL-G-201, Rämistrasse 71, 8006 Zurich
(Google Maps)